To: Governor Scott Walker and Wisconsin state legislators

Shrink Wisconsin's Prison Population by 50%

Shrink Wisconsin's Prison Population by 50%

Prison is a revolving door for the mentally ill and those who struggle with addiction and substance abuse. By investing $75 million/year in treatment alternatives and diversions instead of incarceration, legislators will take an essential step on the path of prison reform.

Why is this important?

As people of faith and moral calling, we can no longer tolerate our neighbors suffering after being imprisoned because of treatable mental health issues and substance abuse. We call on our representatives to help heal our communities with funding for treatment alternatives and diversions for our neighbors who made nonviolent errors in judgment. We cannot allow incarceration to continue to break apart families and cause suffering in our communities.

$75 million/year in increased funding of existing treatment courts and other proven alternatives and diversions, will save the state money and improve the health and safety of our communities. Incarceration costs nearly twice as much as treatment. The state saves $1.93 with each dollar spent on alternatives versus incarceration. In addition, people who get treatment are 20% less likely to return to jail or prison and 13% more likely to be employed after the program than if they were incarcerated.

Additionally, treatment gives parents a second chance and can transform their lives. They can return to their children and friends to rebuild their families, neighborhoods, and communities. For more information, visit www.prayforjusticeinwi.org.

How it will be delivered

On February 14, we hand-delivered our petition to the office of Governor Scott Walker. Then, on March 14, we brought nearly 1,000 people to the Capitol for our big Day of Action! Now, we continue to collect signatures for our next round of action.

Wisconsin

Reasons for signing

  • Mental health issues, which include addiction, need to be treated as health issues not moral issues.
  • A friend of mine asked.
  • Because... someone I have come to care for is in there and has been since he was 15. He made a big mistake, not because he's a bad person but because he didn't have a great role model. He needs a family. I want to be his family.