• RSVP: March 14 Day of Action in Madison
    In Wisconsin, we know we have too many people in our prisons and we know the solution. We know that Treatment Alternatives and Diversions (TAD) work. They are cheaper and more effective than jail and prison time for low-risk offenders. There is no excuse for our legislature and Governor to delay any further. Every day we wait is a day of wasted money and wasted human potential. We need your voice. We need our elected officials to hear that: The evidence is in. The time is now. Expand TAD to $75 million per year in this budget; save more than $75 million in the next budget.
    13 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Michael Mueller
  • President Obama: Ensure Health Equity for Immigrants
    Every year, millions of Americans are locked out of our country’s health care system because of federal policies that prohibit some immigrants, including legal permanent residents, from obtaining health benefits. These are bad policies that cost lives and money. They are policies that were not remedied during health care reform. They should be addressed now, as the country moves forward to fix the broken immigration system.
    9 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Benjamin Linsley
  • Shrink Wisconsin's Prison Population by 50%
    As people of faith and moral calling, we can no longer tolerate our neighbors suffering after being imprisoned because of treatable mental health issues and substance abuse. We call on our representatives to help heal our communities with funding for treatment alternatives and diversions for our neighbors who made nonviolent errors in judgment. We cannot allow incarceration to continue to break apart families and cause suffering in our communities. $75 million/year in increased funding of existing treatment courts and other proven alternatives and diversions, will save the state money and improve the health and safety of our communities. Incarceration costs nearly twice as much as treatment. The state saves $1.93 with each dollar spent on alternatives versus incarceration. In addition, people who get treatment are 20% less likely to return to jail or prison and 13% more likely to be employed after the program than if they were incarcerated. Additionally, treatment gives parents a second chance and can transform their lives. They can return to their children and friends to rebuild their families, neighborhoods, and communities. For more information, visit www.prayforjusticeinwi.org.
    1,181 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Michael Mueller
  • Bloomberg: Don't Let Hurricane Sandy Victims Go Cold This Holiday Season
    For thousands of New Yorkers this winter, the unwanted and uninvited guest is Sandy. Three months after the storm devastated New York, 8,600 New Yorkers living in the Rockaway Peninsula still don’t have power, heat, or help to fix mold so severe it’s causing health problems in children and adults. Clergy in Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island, and Lower Manhattan are supporting congregations reeling from Sandy, and families are trying to maintain their holiday spirit in spite of the hardship. Join faith and community leaders from across New York City as we stand with families in the Rockaways who will be forced to spend their winter in the dark and cold.
    1,524 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Joseph McKellar
  • Raise New York's Minimum Wage
    At $7.25 per hour, New York’s minimum wage remains decades out of date. With growing numbers of New York State residents relying on low-wage jobs to survive, too many workers do not earn enough to afford basic expenses. Governor Cuomo proposed raising New York's minimum wage to $8.75 per hour during his State of the State address this year. Key leaders in the Assembly and Senate have promised action on raising the minimum wage during this session. Now it's time for the legislature to deliver. New York’s lowest-paid workers cannot wait any longer. The Senate and Assembly should pass legislation raising the minimum wage to $8.75 per hour and indexing it to rise automatically with the cost of living each year. Raising the minimum wage is politically popular and morally right. Eighty percent of New York voters support raising the minimum wage.
    1,005 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Andres Kwon
  • “Not One More Child!”
    Seeking asylum is not a crime. It is a desperate cry for mercy from families fleeing the violence of a military government and dangerous gangs. Unless we are of Native American heritage or descended from Africans brought to the US as slaves, we are ALL descendants of immigrants fleeing persecution & violence. Must these families with children face Trump's military force at our borders? Are we not better than this as a country? Not One More Child should face such cruelty.
    1 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Luz Rodriguez Picture
  • Help Medicaid Recipients Keep Their HealthCare
    This is important because having access to healthcare is a crucial part of not only surviving, but thriving, as human beings. Jesus revealed to us that access to healthcare was important to Him; this is why he told us the story of the Good Samaritan. As United Methodists, advocating for everyone to have the economic ability to see a doctor, or to be able to obtain needed surgery, medications, or other treatments is in accordance with our Book of Resolutions. http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/health-care-for-all-in-the-united-states
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Emily Thompson Picture
  • Stop the Deportation of Rickley Lionel
    Rickley is a 24 year old, hardworking young man who has been living in the United States since he was 11 years old. Rickley and his brother Voidette came to the United States to join his mother. Rickley attended high school and has been working in construction since. Voidette, Rickley’s brother, has a disability that limits his opportunity to independently go out and he requires extensive care. Rickley has always been a father figure to Voidette and has been helping his mother with taking care of Voidette. Rickley has two daughters, Emily and Allysi, of 7 and 4 years old who both have American citizenship. Rickley worked in construction in order to help support his family. Rickley has been held in detention since November 2012, and he has only seen Alyssi on one occasion. In June 2013, Rickley was transferred to Alabama and his family has not been able to visit him. Rickley’s father has never been involved in his childhood and Rickley grew up in an environment where domestic violence was not uncommon. Rickley was arrested because he had drugs on him, but the plea agreement which he took also included the sale of drugs. This is not true. However, as a result of his arrest, ICE began a deportation case against Rickley, even though that would mean that Rickley would be separated from his family. Rickley has taken ownership for his past mistakes and is determined to overcome his past struggles by focusing on the future. Rickley has been baptized last August, regularly attends bible classes, and encourages other detainees to get involved as well. The Obama administration has directed local ICE officers to exercise discretion. However, ICE has failed to exercise discretion for Rickley and they are continuing to advocate for his deportation. Additionally, last summer the Obama administration announced a program to defer the deportation of persons who arrived in the United States as children. Rickley and his family desperately want him to remain in the United States, the only country that he considers home. Please sign this petition asking ICE to follow their own directives and not deport Rickley.
    114 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Sarah de Mol
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